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Andrew Frost

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Rodney Pople’s Imagined Histories

In advance of the opening of Rodney Pople’s new series Shell Shocked at Australian Galleries in Sydney, Andrew Frost’s full and unexpurgated essay for the show tackles the controversial painter’s take on the mythology of ANZAC…

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Steve Warburton: history, ambiguity, monuments

In advance of his new solo show at Melbourne’s Tacit gallery, Steve Warburton talks about ambiguity, metaphor and history…

Castlemainia: making regional arts festivals work

Art Life editor Andrew Frost likes to drive very long distances to see art. What he found in Castlemaine Victoria offers a few clues how regional arts events can reshape Australian art…

Long live the new flesh: Lisa McCleary’s sci-fi surfaces

Lisa McCleary discusses her upcoming solos show at Gallery MC, eroticism, surfaces, sci-fi and insane amounts of hard work…

Penalties apply: the landscape of ‘Uncertain Territory’

If you’re the least bit aware of the state of the world, and its past and potential futures, then the ‘landscape’ would have to be one of the most problematic of all curatorial adventures.

Vale Virginia Wilson 1966-2018

It’s with great sadness that I note the passing of a good friend, Virginia Wilson.

Notes From A Very Long Drive

A long looping road trip, to see and judge art, find vintage paperbacks, and the search for something amazing…

Simon Sellars’ Applied Ballardianism: “When you have to shoot, shoot. Don’t talk.”

“I always think of Tuco in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly when he’s ambushed by a man who talks so much he doesn’t realise Tuco has whipped his gun out. Tuco kills him, then gives the corpse some excellent advice: ‘When you have to shoot, shoot. Don’t talk.’ Likewise, with academics: when you have to argue, argue. Don’t blather on.”

Interview: Ian Haig’s ‘Foaming Node’

“The human body, technology, transformation, mutation, cannibalism, the discovery of a new human organ…” 

Transformations through time: Paul White’s iconic realities

“My process became a meditation not only on the image but also personally; a way of dealing with, slowing down and processing the world around me.”