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Why A Mountain: An Interview with Peter Daverington

“Everything felt so cool and consolidated like there was some agreement amongst the art establishment of what is serious and what is not. Romantic Landscape painting was literally a no go zone, career suicide, so that appealed to me. What happened though is that I really came to love it and through some curious fate I ended up living in the Hudson Valley.”

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New Work Friday #206

These works ask “when does something make sense?” – as we are never in total possession of ourself nor in total ignorance…

Six and A Half Questions | Abbey McCulloch

Ha! The coast is a soft target. I’ve lived in the same house since I was a kid and I can still ride around on my bike with a lemonade ice-block, watching the surf, pretending life hasn’t changed since I was about ten.

New Work Friday #205

“Using a science fiction lens, I explore possible futuristic landscapes and creatures inhabiting contaminated coastal ecosystems.New forms of hybrid flora and fauna emerge; mutated corals that are half scleractinian, half plastic, dystopian creatures that remind us of our indifference now and for hundreds of years into the future…”

New Work Friday #204

King was a refugee of Nazi Europe who found love and a home in the foreign landscape of Australia, and until her death aged 100 in 2016 was a subject, like all Australians, of an often blind and indifferent Crown.

New Work Friday #203

‘I have tried to leave them all at a stage that reflects some kind of completion but I also feel as if they have no end.’

New Work Friday #202

This is an embroidery that depicts a garish face in a yellow and black motley pattern.

Modern Lexicon

Modern Lexicon

Art Life , Stuff Oct 05, 2016

Being new – or having or suggesting a state of newness – is the most highly prized virtue of all.

New Work Friday #201

My principal methodology is to reconfigure whatever objects and materials are at hand.

But wait there’s more #14

“Sitting at a slight angle to me, looking very slightly, thoughtfully upwards, she reminds me of a Leonardo da Vinci portrait –Lady with an Ermine (1489-90), perhaps.”