New York Postcard: Born Frees

Art Life , Stuff Jul 29, 2015 No Comments

Even as the winds call George Shaw home, there’s still more than a few shows to be seen…

Chalk Bike

Chalk Bike

Evidence

Evidence

Light Giver, Light Taker

Light Giver, Light Taker

The Moon is Asleep (production still)

The Moon is Asleep (production still)

Borne Frieze is the third exhibition by South African artist Robin Rhode at Lehmann Maupin. The title is an adaptation of the term “Born Frees” which refers to people born after the end of apartheid. In his multi-faceted practice, Rhode likes to contrast old social and political ideals with the desires of today in which freedom and potential exist within the borders of his country. Rhode is predominantly a draughtsman who draws on walls (friezes) with energy and spontaneity, which often renders the subject and work as ephemeral.

Art School 30

Art School 30

Art School 35

Art School 35

Art School 36

Art School 36

Art School 37

Art School 37

Art School 38

Art School 38

At Mitchell-Innes & Nash, the British artist Paul Winstanley presents ten new paintings in his on-going series Art School. Although the subjects came to life originally as a photographic record of empty art school studios during summer vacation in England, Scotland and Wales, the medium-sized panels add a layer of painterly softness to the starkness of these vacated spaces. Standing in the vast gallery rooms looking at depictions of empty spaces which have been hung sparingly, creates a contemplative and evocative atmosphere. The paintings are delicate, beautiful and poetic.

Installation view

Installation view

Atrabiliarios

Atrabiliarios

Plegaria Muda

Plegaria Muda

Untitled (Shirts)

Untitled (Shirts)

Untitled (Shirts) detail

Untitled (Shirts) detail

The Guggenheim Museum is currently showing a thirty-year survey of the Colombian artist Doris Salcedo’s confronting work. Growing up at a time when social injustice, as well as politically motivated torture and murder were a daily reality in the streets of Bogota, Salcedo has spent her career memorialising those who suffered torture, death or simply vanished. Her sculptural works are at once symbolic and visceral, austere and poetic, and they are suffused with reverence and empathy, without being didactic. The slow-burning beauty of this haunting show is simply inescapable.

George Shaw

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